Graffiti from the Past

When we think of graffiti, we usually think of spray painted signs, walls and doors with anything from a symbol or word, a hodgepodge of designs to a unified mural. In most cases, graffiti is considered bad, disrespectful, and ugly.

What about graffiti from 1,850 years ago?

These two profiles were etched into a column with other signs and symbols in front of the Southeast Building (built ca. 150 CE) in the agora in Athens, Greece. The profiles could have been drawn by anyone living today. However, they were not.

These copies come from an American School of Classical Studies at Athens agora excavation report. When I saw them I got chills. Who were these people? (I assume at least two, as probably the latter one was added close to the earlier profile.) Were they students at a school? (The Library of Pantainos was next door to the Southeast Building and apparently had similar graffiti on its columns.) Did these people know each other? Did they end up as artists? As philosophers? There is no way to know.

Nonetheless, these doodles are a bridge to people who lived in another time and place.

Goosebumps.

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What is this?

I spotted this little animal in Fort Tryon Park, nosing around not too far from people sunbathing.

Is it a hedgehog? I know at least one person out there who will know.

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The Rat Comes to Tarrytown

(2017-06-15 001)In June, I was surprised to find the inflatable rat near the Tarrytown Village Hall. I’ve seen The Rat in New York City in front of various buildings where union protests are going on.

There was also a sign from the disgruntled workers. They were shaming Alpine Painting, and their protest was right across the street from the train station.

(2017-06-21 001)The rat appears when non-union workers are used on jobs or if the employer is doing anti-union activities.

One must be wary of all types of rats.

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Parthenon Marbles Coming to the Graduate Center

City College was given copies of the so-called Elgin Marbles–the Parthenon Marbles–as a gift in 1852 from Charles M. Leupp, Esq. The casts, made in the 1830s, were among the first to be sent to the United States. The casts have been in storage until recently. The sculptures are now going to be mounted in the CUNY Graduate Center Library. They will line the wall along 34th Street.

This is exciting.

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Amtrak–at Grand Central

I was going home the one day when I saw an Amtrak train on the screen. Intrigued, I walked over to the track and snapped a quick photo.

According to the conductor I talked to, there will be “a few” Amtrak trains in Grand Central until September, when all the Amtrak trains will be running from Grand Central. Grand Central will be Amtrak’s station until the Empire Tunnel is repaired, at which point Amtrak will return to the hole in the ground that is still called Penn Station although that complex was torn down in 1969.

Wonder what will happen if the Amtrak passengers like leaving from Grand Central instead of the hole in the ground?

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Alice’s Teacup Visit

Anice and Caroline, looking full and happy

My colleagues Anice and Caroline got together with me and we had a nice time at Alice’s Teacup II, which is near Hunter College, the City University of New York.

For those who don’t know about Alice’s Teacup, there are four of them around the city. Of varying sizes, II is the biggest with two floors. We got a wonderful table by the window facing the street. Alice’s serves tea-type of food like scones and sandwiches, all of it delicious. We were there for hours, eating and chatting.

Don’t forget: if you are in Westchester and need a tea fix, then visit the Silver Tips Tea Room in Tarrytown, where afternoon tea is served all day.

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Marching for Women in Poughkeepsie

2017-01-21-006On January 21, I marched to support the rights of women in Poughkeepsie, New York. A close friend of mine braved the trip to Washington, D.C., which I did not want to try and do. So, when Tara, a friend from the Historical Society, suggested Poughkeepsie, I liked the idea. Poughkeepsie, after all, may not be a major city of the United States, but it is still a city with a statement to make. Why not help them make it?

It was cold, but not as cold as it was walking across the bridge over the Hudson. It got colder as soon as we neared the other side, and remained cold until we crossed back over. There was a lot of positive vibes from the participants, and the march was upbeat. I got a cool tee-shirt to mark the occasion.

2017-02-04-001Besides Tara, her friend Joanie came along. We took Metro-North in the wee hours of the morning and then walked over to the site of the march. There was no parking anywhere close to the sight as the lots were packed with participants, with many more looking for places to park.

The pics are of the crossing, of Tara and Joanie, and of a Christmas tree that was still decorated at this late date.

 

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