Tag Archives: Installations (Art)–New York (State)–New York

Along Library Way in Manhattan

(2015-04-17 009)The other day, I was walking to Grand Central and on the way I snapped some photographs of the Humanities and Social Sciences Library of NYPL. (Final project for class.) After snapping some pics, I headed down Madison Avenue and turned onto 41st Street, the block facing Park Avenue. It was then that I realized that I could fulfill one of my dreams.

I stood in the middle of the sidewalk like a tourista and took a photograph of (2015-04-17 008)the sidewalk.

Ah, but not just any part of the sidewalk. 41st Street’s blocks between Fifth Avenue and Park Avenue have been designated “Library Way,” since the main entrance to NYPL is across from 41st Street on Fifth. Besides renaming these two blocks, the city put bronze (well, they appear bronze) plates in the cement to celebrate NYPL. There are all sorts of quotes, designs, whatever in celebration of libraries and, I assume, knowledge and civilization.

This is a popular tourista attraction: standing in the middle of the sidewalks (2015-04-22 011to photograph these amazing markers–much to the annoyance of New Yorkers. Having lived here for years, I knew better. Still, I took my pics, then quickly headed to the terminal.

If you ever come to the city, be sure to stand on 41st Street between Fifth and Park Avenues so that you can read each and every one of these markers. I’ve actually seen some people do this, or I assumed I did since I didn’t stand around and wait for them to finish.

 

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Filed under Art, Libraries, New York City

Art or Not–You Decide

Brownstein (2014-06-24 005)Two weeks ago, I was walking by Madison Square Park and I noticed some new art installations, so I detoured through the park to see what they were.

This art is by Rachel Feinstein. It’s called Folly. And what is a folly? “A folly is an edifice built without function or purpose, or a structure identified by its foolheartiness and the primacy of its appearance.”  The three pieces fit the name; each piece also had its own name.

Though each looks as if it was cut from paper, the medium is aluminum.

There were quite a few people sitting on the grass around the Cliff House.  When I visited the Rococo Hut,  someone had just put his head through the opening and had his picture taken. The Flying Ship was in the shade, so no one was around it. These lawns had previously been closed for seeding.

The installation will be in the park until September 7th if you are interested.

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Filed under Art, New York City